Features

New faces at City College
By | news editor
Oct. 9, 2013

City College welcomed new and long-term temporary faculty at a Sept. 20 campus reception, as well as honoring the recently tenured.

“This is a great time for us, to acknowledge those individuals to have made it through the tenure process and now become full professors at our institution and also welcome those who are just starting that journey and welcome them to our family,” said Mary Turner, vice president of instructional services.

The mood was celebratory as 11 new faculty members were introduced and five instructors were recognized for receiving tenure. Plaques, flowers, hugs and congratulations were distributed among the small crowd of faculty and administrators in the Rodda Hall North conference room.

Professors recently granted tenure were Tony Davis (counseling), Lynn Fujikawa (nursing), Nadine Kirkpatrick (nutrition), Melodi Randolph (dental assisting), and Gayle Williams (accounting).

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What happens after 'Romeo and Juliet'
By | Staff Writer
Oct. 9, 2013

ANYONE WHO TRIES TO create a sequel to William Shakespeare’s famous tragedy, “Romeo and Juliet,” likely finds that such a task is a challenge to execute.

Shakespeare’s name alone forces literary junkies to be hyper cautious when examining work that attempts to meet the late playwright’s standard of passion and drama.

Still, City Theatre actors delivered a bold production of Scottish playwright Sharman Macdonald’s “After Juliet,” a sequel to William Shakespeare’s beloved “Romeo and Juliet” in September and displayed, once again, why City College’s theater program is top notch.

The play, seemed to provide a challenge for the playwright in the way it picks up from Shakespeare’s dramatic ending that leaves any sequel without the original’s two leads.

Still, like the original, here lust and long-lasting family feuds carried the meat of the plot.

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Wrestling with attitude
By | Staff writer
Oct. 9, 2013

Little boys wrestle. It’s what they do.

From adolescence through high school, they grapple, tackle, and take each other down. And, every now and then, one will grow up to actually become a wrestler.

Such is the story of City College sophomore wrestler Alex Chambers, a graduate of Chico High School; a wrestler who has achieved success despite being born without a right hand.

According to Chambers, his mother raised him not to consider himself disabled. In fact, Chambers says having one hand doesn’t discourage him from being active.

“You’ve just got to stay positive and think in a more positive direction than think of it as a negative,” says Chambers. “My mom, she never looked at it as a disability or a handicap; it was just like I was different or something like that. So we pursued everything like I was just one of the kids.”

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A passionate history
By | Guest Writer
Sept. 30, 2013

IN 1963, SHERRI PATTON says when she was a child in North Carolina, she and a few childhood friends were given a key to unlock a gate at the center of a giant fenced wall. They lost the key after it was given to them.

On the other side of the wall were more friends to play with. The gate that separated the friends was placed there to segregate the white and black communities. Unable to open the gate, she and her friends uprooted the fence to get to the other side, to their friends of different colors.

Growing up in the segregated South during the 1960s, Patton, 53, is still breaking down fences as an activist for social justice.

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Project Truth: on Campus
By |
Sept. 25, 2013

Project Truth, a pro-life activist group, visited City College Sept. 9 and 10

to educate students, staff and faculty on their views. The group passed

out pamphlets to visitors in the quad, and displayed photos depicting

images of abortions. Onlookers from both sides of the debate stopped to

discuss the issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The sweet sound of silence
By | Staff Writer
Sept. 11, 2013

Turn off your voice. Speak with your hands. Exclaim with your eyes. Express with your body. Listen with your heart.

These are the rules for City College professor Kevin Clark’s classroom.

Clark is deaf, but not silent. He quietly conducts his class by weaving elements of deaf culture into the vibrant dialect that is American Sign Language, helping his students to understand the rich and sometimes tragic history of his community.

Clark, 45, an active guy, who just happens to be deaf, enjoys cycling and hiking. He has taught A.S.L at City College for 10 years. He has also traveled the world, including Europe, South Africa, Venezuela and Japan.

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Welcome To City College
By |
Sept. 11, 2013

Another year at City College, and for some, navigating the campus is old hat. For the new faces on campus, however, it can be daunting. No need to stress though, the staff of The Express has put together a guide of “need-to know’s” for the campus newbies. Mahalie Oshiro | mahalie.oshiro@gmail.com

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One step back, two steps forward
By | Guest Writer
May 9, 2013

Heather Oakley loves baseball. Her father coaches the sport, and she has been playing since she was 5 years old. For Oakley, a first-base player, the softball field has been a home away from home for years. But there is one softball field she hopes to never step on again.

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Rise to the occasion
By | Guest Writer
May 9, 2013

Tomatoes for $3? JuanLaChica says that is something he cannot get used to paying. Tomatoes are the same produce he picked in the Central Valley fields as a child. LaChica’s father planted and picked toma­toes in the fields. At the young age of 9, he joined his father in the tomato fields, working in the heat of the valley.

A City College counselor for more than 30 years, LaChica says he worked every job possible in and out of school but always appreciated “the value of a dollar” and all the hard work and obstacles that occurred just to earn a living. Growing up, LaChica says he never even dreamed of going to college or anything outside his daily world. He grew up a true Californian Chicano, born in the Imperial Valley and raised in the San Joaquin Valley.

But one day after a school official spoke to his brother about the option of being paid to attend college, LaChica was sold. Having originally majored in computer science, LaChica quickly realized he was definitely more of a people person who thrived on his interactions with others, so he changed his major to sociology. He graduated with a bachelor’s in sociology…» Read More



A new hub of activity
By | Features Editor
May 8, 2013

A new spot has made its way to Davis’ West Village apartment community for it’s eating and drinking pleasure.

Mere steps away from the entrance to Sacramento City College Davis Center, Hub, a café, kitchen and market is in its finishing stages of construction and will soon be fully open to the public.

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