Editorials

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A case for Cooledge

From Rodda to Lillard, to Lusk and Hughes there are more than a few named structures at City College.

Of the 24 significant landmarks listed on the City College campus map, eight are named after administrators, professors or coaches Of those eight, only the Fischbacher Fine Arts Building is named after a woman.

Amalia Fischbacher was a City College art instructor for 35 years, who was widely known for her love of color. Inside the Fischbacher building resides the Kondos gallery, named for Gregory Kondos, a renowned local painter.

Lusk established the aeronautics program at City College. Rodda was a teacher who later turned to politics. Mohr was the school president from 1949 to 1956. Lillard Hall is named after the first president of Sacramento Junior College.


Illustration by Carl Phillips

Federal bill to reduce student debt misses mark

For many students the foundation of a university education or career begins at the community college. And that is where many students assume their first loans, leading to some serious high-interest future repayments.

At California community colleges the BOG fee waiver covers much of the tuition for many eligible students, while grants or scholarships absorb the cost of textbooks and assist with living costs. But many students must take out student loans to pay rent and compensate for income loss when a school schedule replaces or reduces a work schedule.


Illustration by Cody Drabble | Senior Designer

Event challenges views on tolerance

The “Sex Positive” movement took over City College in February, when a foursome of student clubs sponsored an event to educate and discuss gender, relationships and sex in a safe and judgment-free environment.  The four-day event leading up to Valentine’s Day featured a series of open and honest discussions on sex-related topics ranging from porn to safe sex practices to nude dancers’ unionization.

One of the more popular speakers — and more controversial — was Janet Hardy, co-author of  The Ethical Slut: A Practical Guide to Polyamory, Open Relationships & Other Adventures. Her arguments were engaging and disquieting. They forced self-reflection on personal biases and our understandings about the laws of sexual attraction.


Illustration by Carl Phillips

State of the Union speaks to students

If you never used the emergency room for your primary care physician, you might not understand what being uninsured means.

If you never left home for class three hours early because you were between paychecks, could not afford gas and had to take the bus, you might not understand the significance of a minimum wage increase.

And if you never sat up late worrying about finding a decent job after graduation, you might not understand fearing the inevitable student loan bill that follows a diploma.


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The importance of humanities

“Do you think the main role of college is to make students ready for the job market? If so, why? If not, why not?”

This may sound like a test question, but it’s actually a question posed by Katherine Schulten in a Nov. 16 article in the New York Times. In the article, Schulten suggests that college students are losing interest in the humanities as majors.

She questions whether higher education should just be about vocational and job training as opposed to focusing on the teaching of critical thinking, expanding knowledge of the world and exposing students to diverse attitudes.

As the scope of college changes, especially at community colleges, it’s certainly an interesting and relevant question. How important is it to study  elds like philosophy, culture, languages, music, art and history when these are  elds that don’t easily translate into jobs?


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Volunteer to give thanks

The sights and sounds of the holidays are upon us, as Sacramento residents and Americans across the nation begin to decorate their houses for Halloween—some even for Christmas already—and purchase hoards of goods from multiple retail locations.

The City College Panther statue was covered in pumpkins recently for a Queer/Straight Alliance club fund-raiser selling those plump little orange squash. While this was for a noble cause, raising money for a college club, it seems this is what the holidays have become more and more in recent years.

Specifically, Thanksgiving and Christmas have become so commercial that most people celebrate these holidays without even realizing what they’re all about.


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Christians vs. Halloween

Growing up Baptist, I was taught that Christians shouldn’t celebrate Halloween. When I was a bit older, I was told it was a satanic holiday,…


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Nightmare on Job Hunt Lane

OCTOBER MARKS THE BEGINNING of the holiday season, the onset of fall and the spooks, ghouls, ghosts and goblins that make it obvious it’s time to dress up in…


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The debt of college education

  Student loan debt probably isn’t as common among community college students as with University of California or California State University students, and those who do…


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Smoking: To ban or not to ban?

THE SMOKING OF CIGARETTES is a topic that has created a deep divide among those who smoke and those who don’t.

We all know the health risks, yet many people continue to smoke. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cigarette consumption kills more than 440,000 Americans per year, and second-hand smoke causes 49,400 deaths per year.

According to legalinfo.ca.gov, smoking in most enclosed workplaces in California, including inside restaurants and bars, was banned in 1995. In April 1970, advertising of cigarettes and tobacco products on TV was banned in the United States, says druglibrary.org. And from the 1970s to as recently as 2010, laws have continued to be passed in the United States to ban advertising on tobacco products including from magazines and billboards, according to Wikipedia.