Editorials

Nightmare on Job Hunt Lane
By |
Oct. 23, 2013

OCTOBER MARKS THE BEGINNING of the holiday season, the onset of fall and the spooks, ghouls, ghosts and goblins that make it obvious it’s time to dress up in silly costumes and eat yummy mallow crème candy corn and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups shaped like pumpkins.

For community college students, though, it can be a time of high stress as we look to  finish our last few classes before graduating with our  first degrees. On the other hand it can also be a time of excitement for those students just starting college, either following high school graduation or coming back to school for one reason or another.

» Read More



The debt of college education
By |
Oct. 8, 2013

 

Student loan debt probably isn’t as common among community college students as with University of California or California State University students, and those who do carry debt most likely owe a lot less money  than upper division students.

However, a great many students at City College will eventually move on to pursue bachelor’s or higher degrees and will take on heaps of debt—that is, unless they are fortunate enough to score a sweet, sweet scholarship or  two or three.

Ask any student or parent who is paying for someone’s college education: Something needs to be done to make obtaining an education less expensive.

In fact, for most people, facing the inevitable amounts of money they’ll need to pay back for their oh-so-coveted higher educations is something that weighs on one’s conscience throughout their college careers.

But no matter how much we would like the threat of student debt to make like brick-and-mortar Blockbuster stores and disappear, it’s more like Cher in that it just won’t go away. 

The solution seems simple: Make college less expensive by cutting all the extras. Just charge for classes and books unless students opt to pay for other things like dorm space. 

The…» Read More



By |
Sept. 30, 2013

THE SMOKING OF CIGARETTES is a topic that has created a deep divide among those who smoke and those who don’t.

We all know the health risks, yet many people continue to smoke. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cigarette consumption kills more than 440,000 Americans per year, and second-hand smoke causes 49,400 deaths per year.

According to legalinfo.ca.gov, smoking in most enclosed workplaces in California, including inside restaurants and bars, was banned in 1995. In April 1970, advertising of cigarettes and tobacco products on TV was banned in the United States, says druglibrary.org. And from the 1970s to as recently as 2010, laws have continued to be passed in the United States to ban advertising on tobacco products including from magazines and billboards, according to Wikipedia.

» Read More



'I Have a Dream' for City College
By | Print Editor-in-Chief
Sept. 11, 2013

The U.S. recently celebrated the 50-year anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, originally given on Aug. 28, 1963, in front of approximately 250,000 civil rights supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington.

The speech, of course, pleaded for the end of racism in the United States. The history behind the speech is even greater because it was delivered 100 years after Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation into law, ending slavery. The fight for freedom for African-Americans was just beginning, and, as King pointed out in his speech, 100 years later, racism was still very much alive.

Many would argue that the dream of King has still not been reached today. The controversial outcome of the Trayvon Martin case is just one indication that racism and hatred toward other cultures is still very much an issue in America, especially for certain groups.

At City College’s pre-semester Convocation held by administrators and district leaders for the staff and faculty of City College, Dr. Brian King (no relation to Martin Luther King Jr.), the chancellor of the Los Rios Community College District, mentioned that the part of the speech we…» Read More



So it goes
By | Print & Online Managing Editor
Sept. 7, 2013

Listen: My mind has come unstuck in time.

Momentous things happened last week; the curious overlap has me fizzing with happiness and heartache. My consciousness hopscotched across time and space, drawing unexpected connections between a friend’s wedding, a great novel, an impending war and the memory of my mother.

» Read More



By |
April 26, 2013

In recent years, budget cuts have changed the entire scope of the community college system.

There was a time when community college courses were free, easy to get into and students had a greater sense of community involvement and outreach. To be successful on the college level today requires a small fortune, lots of dedication and a flexible schedule.

Getting into classes in a specific major isn’t usually that much of a challenge. However, getting into general education classes is almost always headache-inducing.

» Read More



Sports madness
By |
March 18, 2013

Painted faces, entirely paintedbodies, huge head cutouts, and raucous crowds—these all describe a National Colle­giate Athletic Association basketball game.

Not many sporting events can draw a crowd like an NCAA game. It’s basically like the Seattle Seahawks fans at Centu­ryLink Stadium, who are known as the 12th man, and the fans at Arco Arena (now known as Sleep Train Arena) when the Kings were in their heyday, mixed with large amounts of alcohol.

With all the young fans in Califor­nia rooting for teams hundreds or even thousands of miles away, it may be hard to believe that City College’s sports teams (or most community college sports pro­grams) don’t have a very large following.

Although community college teams aren’t on a national level, there are still plen­ty of students, as well as former students, who one would think might want to come out and show support for their school.

Most sports fans believe that there’s nothing quite like NCAA basketball. The passion and camaraderie among this group is unrivaled. Many college players never go on to play in the pros, so they’re putting in nothing but effort because they’re playing for the love of the game, rather than…» Read More



By | News Editor
Feb. 28, 2013

People value their personal privacy, as evidenced by bathroom door locks, window blinds and passwords.

As Americans, however, we don’t just value privacy—we expect it. And since­ The Privacy Act of 1975 guarantees privacy, any sense of self-entitlement to such is rightly ours. Recently though, our constitutional right to all things private has been under attack, giving room to question if we really have as much privacy as we once allowed ourselves to believe.

Take for example, the use of unmanned aircraft, more commonly referred to as drones. Drones have been making headlines quite a bit lately—twice on the front page of ­the Sacramento Bee this month, and not for accomplishments in terms of the fight on terrorism. Rather, on speculation of whether our privacy is under attack by law enforcement agencies right here in the U.S.

Yes, federal law does prohibit the use of drones in densely populated urban areas. However, an Unmanned Aircraft Systems Fact Sheet released Feb. 15 by the Federal Aviation Administration says there is a way around the prohibition. One only needs “to obtain a Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (COA) for public aircraft.” ­

The UAS Fact Sheet goes on to explain,…» Read More



Clearing the smoke on gun control
By |
Feb. 7, 2013

Whether it’s as far away as Sandy Hook Elementary School, a little closer like a movie theater in Colorado or right here at home—from gun scares at Arden Mall to officers being shot in our own backyard—a gun getting into the wrong hands and being used to cause chaos is something that’s simply happening too much lately.

With the entire nation wondering what the Obama Administration will ultimately do to fight the misuse of guns, one thing is clear: There is almost a down-the-middle split when it comes to opinions on guns.

On one hand, there’s the pro-gun crowd, those who feel the government is infringing on their rights by regulating gun ownership. These folks feel that guns should be used for protection, hunting, and that if everyone has a gun, things like the Aurora, Colo., theater shooting would result in a fewer deaths because a gunman like James Holmes could be stopped with another gun.

But for those of us on the other side of the spectrum, controlling guns is simply a way to help protect the innocent, especially the children of our nation. It isn’t about infringing on the rights…» Read More



Cuddle up with some eggnog
By | Arts and Entertainment Editor
Dec. 13, 2012

Jason Van Sandt-Editor in Chief Jasonv1977@gmail.com

The year was 1988, I was 11 years old and my uncle Jimmy was over for Thanksgiving dinner. My family had just finished dining when my uncle suggested we all go see a movie afterwards. This was a break in our normal holiday festivities. We would usually eat, watch television afterwards before slipping off into our turkey-fueled commas, but my uncle’s suggestion gained traction and soon we were all off to the theater to see the newest Bill Murray film the day it came out into theaters. I was amazed to see a packed theater; I had always thought people just stayed home on Thanksgiving, and also thrilled to see “Scrooged” before all my friends at school. Now no holiday season is complete until I sit and watch Bill Murray in “Scrooged.”

  Daniel Wilson-Online Managing Editor daniel.wilson8504@yahoo.com

The greatest holiday movie ever is an easy choice for me. I’ve been watching “A Christmas Story” since I was a child and have seen it at least 200 times. It combines the perfect example of the American Christmas experience with great actors, a funny and entertaining story and unforgettable scenes, quotes and moments to create…» Read More