Over the hurdles

Ronnie Floyd runs through this ladder obstacle. Though Floyd moved swiftly through this warm up exercise he, like the rest of his team mates, has to control his steps so as not to knock over one of the hurdles.Callib Carver | callibcarver.express@gmail.com

Ronnie Floyd runs through this ladder obstacle. Though Floyd moved swiftly through this warm up exercise he, like the rest of his team mates, has to control his steps so as not to knock over one of the hurdles.
Callib Carver | callibcarver.express@gmail.com

Ronnie Floyd, 19, a member of the City College track team and a sophomore, didn’t know about the opportunities that came with college or playing sports until he moved from Oakland to Sacramento his freshmen year of high school. He began playing football his sophomore year as a wide receiver and found, in his senior year, track was something that came more natural to him. He hasn’t stopped running since.

Last season, Floyd, along with the other three members of his 4×400 meter relay team, earned the title All-American after finishing third in the state with a time of 3 minutes and 13 seconds; All-Americans are comprised of the state’s top four athletes in a given sport in each event.

According to Floyd, social science major, he’s improved as an athlete through the work and help of City College’s track and field coaching staff. Now, he says, he’d like to share his knowledge with others.

“I don’t think I would be where I am at today if it wasn’t for them [coaches Rob Dewar, Lisa Bauduin, and Julie Ferrara-Jones],” says Floyd.

This is Floyd’s second year on the City College track and field team; during his time on the team, men’s head coach Rob Dewar says the athlete has grown a lot.

“Ronnie came in not knowing what he wanted to do. He just ran. It has been a two-year project with him and he has grown a lot,” Dewar says.

Relay teammate Jesse White, 19, a City College sophomore, describes Floyd as a focused athlete who makes his team members laugh. White says Floyd encourages his teammates with speeches during meets and also gives feedback and pointers during practice.

“In practice the coaches have us make certain times and when some teammates are having difficulty making those times, he [Floyd] will give pointers on certain techniques to help them make that time,” White says.

Floyd says he notices changes between his freshman and sophomore years on the team. Now, he says, everything comes easier.

“I know what to expect–[how to] overcome adversity–and [what] knowledge to pass on to the freshmen on our team to let them know what to expect,” says Floyd. “[I want] to let them know how to get through stuff that they might not know how to prepare for.”

Floyd says one of his biggest motivators is the understanding that he can get his education paid for through athletic scholarships, he says. But he adds, he also finds pride in performing well.

“I want to be the best athlete. I want to be No. 1 in the state and I want my team to be No. 1 in the state–I just want to be the best and those two things will drive me everyday,” says Floyd.

Floyd says he would also like to continue mentoring other athletes as either a professional coach or scout.

“Hopefully I will be an athletic director, but before that comes I would like to be a scout or a coach because I feel I have knowledge to pass on to the youth,” says Floyd. “Specifically giving knowledge on how they can carry themselves onto the next level in their sport.”