Family that plays together
Two City College brothers compete for the same team

J.D. Villanueva | Staff writer |

Brothers Aaron and Alan Tombleson are throwers for City College's track and field team. J.D. Villanueva | villanuevaexpress@gmail.com

These days it’s not uncommon for siblings to compete in the same sport. Think Edgar and Adrian Gonzalez, Peyton and Eli Manning, and Venus and Serena Williams, to name just a few.

City College has two names to add to that list: Aaron and Alan Tombleson, two brothers who not only share the same blood, but also share a passion for track and field.

“It has been like this from the beginning, ever since we grew up,” says Alan. “We have competed together in everything, especially against one another, from riding bikes, lifting to throwing.”

Aaron, 27, is a kinesiology major and Alan, 25, is a sports psychology major.

Aaron has been throwing at City College for two years, and Alan is in his first year. Aaron, ranks highest in shot put and hammer, while Alan ranks in discus and shot put for Northern California Community Colleges.

Both brothers say they feed off the support they get from one another. “Being with my brother in the same sport has helped me a lot. It’s a lot better to have someone to work out with, especially someone near my level that likes to work out as much as I do,” says Aaron. “It is a lot easier to get in shape and get ready for the sport. He pushes me a lot to do better in some of my throws.”

Both brothers have also served in the military. Aaron served in Afghanistan with the Marine Corps, and Alan served in Iraq with the Air Force.

“Being in the military helped us. We are both personal trainers. I got certified while in the military. Hard work, dedication and the military helps us with responsibility toward the sport,” says Alan.

When one brother is competing, the other is usually there to cheer him on.

“They motivate each other, they train together. It gives them a training partner. All brothers naturally compete with each other, and that definitively helps to keep each other motivated,” says head men’s track and field coach Rob Dewar.

Both Aaron and Alan were introduced to the sport by their older brother when Aaron was in the eighth grade and Alan in the seventh grade. These days, Alan focuses more on throwing the disc while Aaron also throws the disc, as well as the hammer and shot put.

Both brothers say track and field is more enjoyable since they started playing together.

“I like the sport a lot better when I’m playing with him; it is definitively more motivating. It’s better to throw with him than not throw with him,” says Alan.