City College aims for gun-free campus

Sargeant Hien Nguyen crosses the City College quad, looking for another officer, after responding to a request to appear in the financial aid lab inside the business building. | Callib Carver | callibcarver.express@gmail.com

Sargeant Hien Nguyen crosses the City College quad, looking for another officer, after responding to a request to appear in the financial aid lab inside the business building. | Callib Carver | callibcarver.express@gmail.com

While the federal governement’s position on gun control is complex to some, City College has clearly defined its stand on the matter.

In accordance with California Penal Code Section 626.9, the SCC Student Standard of Conduct states that it is illegal, as well as cause for expulsion, for a student to bring a  rearm on campus.

However, students do bring guns on campus, and school shootings do occur. For example, LRCCD Daily Crime Log documents an arrest made Jan. 22 at City College for carrying a concealed unloaded  firearm while on campus.“is an important issue in our society and…in our institutions particularly,” says Debra Crumpton, professor of business, whose division meetings discuss campus safety.

Other faculty have seen a short  film, “RUN.HIDE.FIGHT. Surviving an Active Shooter Event” (online at http://www. youtube.com/watch?v=5VcSwejU2D0&feature=youtu.be), available to help teach students, faculty and sta how to protect themselves if a shooter were to open  fire on campus.

City College campus police officer Chris Boothe said he agrees with the film’s premise to first run and then hide when necessary.

“If you are cornered and you have no other choice,  fight,” Boothe said.

According to Boothe, calling 911 as soon as possible is critical to saving lives.

“The faster we [police] get in there, the quicker we apply a threat to that person, the [fewer] people that are going to die, and the more likely it is to end quickly,” said Boothe.

Some students prefer to rely on what they know. David Singh, 39, psychology major, says his own experience while the military included weekly training in stopping armed threats.

“I wouldn’t look to the cops. I would look to my veteran friends,” says Singh.

According to Boothe, campus police receive periodic training in rapid response to active shooter situations, preparing to go directly to the threat and “to take them down before they can hurt anyone else.”

Should an active shooter situation arise at City College, campus police would be in immediate contact with city and county law enforcement.

Police would also activate the Emergency Operation Center (EOC), a standardized nationwide system to improve coordination among emergency responders.

“They have the same kind of instant command structure,” said Boothe.

Of course, vigilance and prevention are always the  rst defense. Boothe encourages every person at City College to be proactive and to report suspicious activity.

“See something, say something if you think someone might have a gun on campus,” said Boothe. “It’s better to be safe than sorry.” 