Features

City College patrol sergeant has seen it all
By | Guest Writer
May 8

Jinky-Jay Lampano, a City College patrol sergeant and watch commander, says he has seen every crime from domestic violence to carrying firearms on campus. He says working for the Los Rios Police Department has changed his life, and the lives of others as well.

Lampano was hired in 2006, and he says it felt like his calling when he initially applied for the job eight years ago.

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Veteran aeronautics professor began career at City College
By | Staff Writer
May 7

It’s a common cliché that principals, teachers, professors and other educators often recite: I want my students to soar.

Only a lucky few get to turn that metaphor into reality.

City College’s Phillip Cypret, aeronautics professor and lifelong pilot, has spent almost 50 years pursuing his life’s passion for flight, never staying grounded for long.

This semester, Cypret teaches a full-time schedule of evening classes. He lectures on turbine engines, large aircraft systems and other topics on the technical end of the spectrum.

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The master planner retires
By | Editor in Chief
May 7

With the academic year winding down, I once again sat across from his desk, reporter’s notebook in hand. Binders filled with years of budgets, proposals, plans and agendas still sat on the built-in shelves surrounding the room. There is something about sitting across from Vice President Administrative Services Robert Martinelli that inclines me to straighten my posture. This time the subject of my report was not about construction timelines or cafeteria contracts—my assignment was about him. After almost 14 years at City College, the master planner was set to retire.

The first question was a simple one: “What did you do before you came to City College?” Always prepared, Martinelli quietly slid me a two-page biography that highlighted a long and decorated Air Force career.

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The field trip of a lifetime
By | Staff Writer
April 29

Twenty-one city college students around the world are midway through their spring semesters abroad, expanding their educations while taking in the rich heritage of their surroundings.

By taking a full-time schedule of courses with the Study Abroad program, City College students are experiencing new lifestyles and cultures, all while earning transferable credits.

In Florence, Italy, City College biology major Luis Rodriguez has used his Roma Pass to ride the Metro, visited the Sistine Chapel and attended mass at the Vatican.

Rodriguez says he is looking forward to spring break when he and other students in the program will travel.

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Put down the pen, pick up a gamepad
By | News Editor
April 10

If there’s one thing that’s for sure in life, it’s that being a video gamer and a college student is a tough combination to juggle.

It’s hard enough trying to find time for any hobbies while slaving over stacks of paper, reading endless pages of textbook goodness, studying all night long for tests and quizzes and trying to stay awake through all those hours of lectures, but free time to play video games? What’s that?

Luckily, spring break is coming up and it’s an exciting time because that shiny new Xbox One and Play-Station 4 actually have some games coming out to play. The recently released “Infamous: Second Son” for PS4, “TitanFall” for Xbox One, and the multi-console “Metal Gear Solid: Ground Zeroes” are sure to keep gamers busy during this year’s break from classes.

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A life led in pursuit of childhood education
By | Features Editor
April 10

Dr. Elvie C. Watts, child education advocate and educator left her mark on City College and many other places in her 97 years. She died March 29, leaving behind a legacy of working on behalf of early childhood education.

“She affected people’s lives,” says her daughter, Ethel Watts, a current student at City College. “She believed that all children should begin with a preschool education. She believed in supporting parents of preschool-aged children by sharing knowledge of the different stages of early childhood.”

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Ideas for spring break reading
By | Staff Writer
April 10

Spring is finally here, which means so is spring break, which is scheduled for April 14-18. That also means it’s finally time to kick your feet up and enjoy the sun. It’s also time to pull out a good book and read it until it’s over and then read it again.

After all, it was Oscar Wilde who once said, “If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all.”

Or, if you’re looking for something new instead, here is a list of suggested reads for this well-needed break.

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Brain candy binge over break
By | Associate Editor
April 9

Movie marathoning and TV binge-watching—the act of devouring multiple seasons of a show in a very short time—has become a delightfully mindless pursuit of students and faculty alike.

Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon Instant Video, iTunes, and Vudu—to name a few of the legal services out there—give viewers instant access to a dizzying amount of content.

Here is some recommended viewing for a week of well-earned laziness.

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SCC student photographer shoots at a new pace
By | Guest Writer
April 9

His pace is steady, controlled. Reaching the blue bench, he adjusts his backpack and turns his head right. He stares down the tracks for a sign his ride is coming.

“The light rail kind of changes your lifestyle,” he says. “It slows you down a bunch.”

The front left pocket of his jeans provides a safe space for a point-and-shoot Nikon. Around his neck, a Rolleicord takes hold, inherited from his late grandfather. The large, black boxlike camera is adjusted carefully into position.

“Walk this way,” he calmly instructs, eyeing the train from a distance. “Our ride is here.”

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Learning to love life
By | News Editor
March 28

Legendary Yankees player Lou Gehrig is not only known for his triumphs as an all-time great first baseman, but also as a pioneer in raising awareness for the terminal disease that killed him in 1941.

“I might have had a tough break, but I have an awful lot to live for,” said Lou Gehrig in 1939 during his goodbye speech at Yankees Stadium, explaining that even though his disease stopped him from playing baseball, he didn’t let it stop his love for life.

Lou Gehrig’s disease—amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)–is a disease that gradually kills the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, which control the muscles all over the body, eventually making it hard or impossible to walk, talk, eat, swallow or breathe. Most people diagnosed with the disease die within 3-5 years after the onset of symptoms, but in rare cases, people can live for much longer.

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