Features

A life led in pursuit of childhood education
By | Features Editor
April 10

Dr. Elvie C. Watts, child education advocate and educator left her mark on City College and many other places in her 97 years. She died March 29, leaving behind a legacy of working on behalf of early childhood education.

“She affected people’s lives,” says her daughter, Ethel Watts, a current student at City College. “She believed that all children should begin with a preschool education. She believed in supporting parents of preschool-aged children by sharing knowledge of the different stages of early childhood.”

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Ideas for spring break reading
By | Staff Writer
April 10

Spring is finally here, which means so is spring break, which is scheduled for April 14-18. That also means it’s finally time to kick your feet up and enjoy the sun. It’s also time to pull out a good book and read it until it’s over and then read it again.

After all, it was Oscar Wilde who once said, “If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all.”

Or, if you’re looking for something new instead, here is a list of suggested reads for this well-needed break.

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Brain candy binge over break
By | Associate Editor
April 9

Movie marathoning and TV binge-watching—the act of devouring multiple seasons of a show in a very short time—has become a delightfully mindless pursuit of students and faculty alike.

Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon Instant Video, iTunes, and Vudu—to name a few of the legal services out there—give viewers instant access to a dizzying amount of content.

Here is some recommended viewing for a week of well-earned laziness.

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SCC student photographer shoots at a new pace
By | Guest Writer
April 9

His pace is steady, controlled. Reaching the blue bench, he adjusts his backpack and turns his head right. He stares down the tracks for a sign his ride is coming.

“The light rail kind of changes your lifestyle,” he says. “It slows you down a bunch.”

The front left pocket of his jeans provides a safe space for a point-and-shoot Nikon. Around his neck, a Rolleicord takes hold, inherited from his late grandfather. The large, black boxlike camera is adjusted carefully into position.

“Walk this way,” he calmly instructs, eyeing the train from a distance. “Our ride is here.”

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Learning to love life
By | News Editor
March 28

Legendary Yankees player Lou Gehrig is not only known for his triumphs as an all-time great first baseman, but also as a pioneer in raising awareness for the terminal disease that killed him in 1941.

“I might have had a tough break, but I have an awful lot to live for,” said Lou Gehrig in 1939 during his goodbye speech at Yankees Stadium, explaining that even though his disease stopped him from playing baseball, he didn’t let it stop his love for life.

Lou Gehrig’s disease—amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)–is a disease that gradually kills the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, which control the muscles all over the body, eventually making it hard or impossible to walk, talk, eat, swallow or breathe. Most people diagnosed with the disease die within 3-5 years after the onset of symptoms, but in rare cases, people can live for much longer.

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Fitness: a family affair
By | Sports Editor
March 26

Drops of sweat collect on the rubber-padded floors of the City College gym as Victor Lagunas Sr. approaches the 10-mile mark in his workout riding one of the schools stationary bicycles. Lagunas biked 13 miles on this day, one more than his usual 12.

At the 13-mile mark Lagunas stops. Momentum from the turning wheels carries his legs through a few more pedals until he comes to a rest. He takes the white gym towel draped around his neck and wipes the sweat from his thinning gray hair and forehead. His two sons, Victor Jr. and Gilbert—also wrapping up their workouts, come over to meet their 90-year-old father, as they have after every workout for more than a decade.

The Lagunas family’s tenure at City College spans over 50 years. Lagunas’ oldest son Victor Jr. attended classes in the mid-1960s, graduating with an associate’s degree. Lagunas’ three other children followed suit, each spending time at City College before transferring to four-year institutions.

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Former Panther rocked on ‘The Voice’
By |
March 26

At City College, the baseball diamond is a place where hard-working students become devoted athletes. It is also where an athlete named Jeremy Briggs stepped off home plate and into his music career. After joining a local Sacramento band as its vocalist, he couldn’t pass up the opportunity to further his career by auditioning for NBC’s “The Voice.”

Although Briggs qualified for the show and appeared in the first few episodes, he was eliminated on the first “battle duet” March 18. He may not have hit a home run on “The Voice,” but Briggs remains a star in many City College memories.

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HAIRitage exhibit celebrates the connection between hair and identity
By | Features Editor
March 15

Hair defines people. A barbershop or beauty parlor does not just give a haircut—it gives a haven for self-expression. People in the business and customers know there is an intimacy that connects everyone in universal ways.

“Everybody hangs their hat up at the door. When you come there, there’s always respect for each other…we believe in a traditional way of being a community center,” says Marichal J. Brown, creator of “HAIRitage: A Fine Art and Photo Exhibition,” visiting City College on the third floor of the Learning Resource Center through March 6.

According to James Sweeney, a regular at Brown’s family barbershop, it is a place where anyone can say what needs to be said.

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SCC theater arts department enlivens classic tales
By | Staff Writer
March 15

There are parties, fistfights, sexy ladies and playboys, a hitchhiker, drunks and people living in a boiler. And then there’s a scientist named Doc Ricketts, who catches frogs and starfish in the tide pools off the shore of Monterey in the 1930s.

All of these characters are portrayed by the 35 actors playing over seventy roles in John Steinbeck’s “Cannery Row,” directed by Christine Nicholson, at the main stage of City College’s Performing Arts Center.

The set invokes Monterey right down to the starfish on the rocks.

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10 suprising things from City College’s past
By |
March 13

Founded in 1916 as Sacramento Junior College, City College is replete with history. Here are 10 interesting and little-known facts.

• The college’s first classes were taught on the top floor of the old Sacramento High School at 18th and K streets. In 1926 the campus moved to its current location, across the street from the brand new William Land Park.

• The first graduating class of 1918 consisted of six students, all women. That same year the college closed for two years as the country plunged into World War I, and some of its staff went to fight or volunteer for the war effort.

• In 1920 Belle Cooledge, a former high school math teacher and a future mayor of Sacramento, headed the junior college as dean after World War I until the appointment of the first president, Jeremiah B. Lillard, in 1923.

• In the early years sophomores imposed a student enforced “frosh” dress code for male students that required a dink (beanie cap) and blue jeans to be worn by all freshmen. The student enforced dress code for freshmen women required pigtails, fake freckles and horn rimmed glasses.

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