Articles by Daniel Wilson

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Retiring class of 2014 bids farewell

The retiring faculty and staff members for 2014 were honored at a retirement reception April 30 at City College. During the event, all outgoing staff…


City College's new Student Services building nears completion and is set to open in 2015. Photo by Gabrielle Smith | Staff Photographer | gsmith@gmail.com

New building on schedule for completion

In June 2013, a vintage City College building, known to students as the Student Services and Administration of Justice building, was torn down and a construction project to create a new student services building began.

According to City College Vice President of Administrative Services Robert Martinelli, the new two-story building, which will include 16,000 square feet of usable space, doubles the space of the original building, and is on schedule to meet its February 2015 completion goal, partly thanks to California’s recent dry weather.


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Put down the pen, pick up a gamepad

If there’s one thing that’s for sure in life, it’s that being a video gamer and a college student is a tough combination to juggle.

It’s hard enough trying to find time for any hobbies while slaving over stacks of paper, reading endless pages of textbook goodness, studying all night long for tests and quizzes and trying to stay awake through all those hours of lectures, but free time to play video games? What’s that?

Luckily, spring break is coming up and it’s an exciting time because that shiny new Xbox One and Play-Station 4 actually have some games coming out to play. The recently released “Infamous: Second Son” for PS4, “TitanFall” for Xbox One, and the multi-console “Metal Gear Solid: Ground Zeroes” are sure to keep gamers busy during this year’s break from classes.


Former City College student Cathy Speck speaks to professor Joanne Moylan-Aube's Psychology 390 class inside Temporary 6 March 10 about her struggles with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and how she copes with death within her family. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord, according to alas.org. Elizabeth Ramirez | staff photographer | elizabethramirezexpress@gmail.com

Learning to love life

Legendary Yankees player Lou Gehrig is not only known for his triumphs as an all-time great first baseman, but also as a pioneer in raising awareness for the terminal disease that killed him in 1941.

“I might have had a tough break, but I have an awful lot to live for,” said Lou Gehrig in 1939 during his goodbye speech at Yankees Stadium, explaining that even though his disease stopped him from playing baseball, he didn’t let it stop his love for life.

Lou Gehrig’s disease—amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)–is a disease that gradually kills the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, which control the muscles all over the body, eventually making it hard or impossible to walk, talk, eat, swallow or breathe. Most people diagnosed with the disease die within 3-5 years after the onset of symptoms, but in rare cases, people can live for much longer.


Photo by Dianne Rose|Staff Photographer| dianne.rose.express@gmail.com

Marchers demand lower tuition fees

The annual March in March rally for higher education took the message of affordability “from the classroom to the Capitol” on March 3 as City College students joined others from several California community colleges on the south steps, despite the rainy and cold weather conditions.

The rally took place from 11 a.m. to noon and featured several speakers, including Assembly members, community college students and professors. Approximately 300 students showed up at the Capitol, chanting slogans like “no cuts, no fees—education must be free,” and “students united—we will never be divided.”

Student Senate President for California Community Colleges Aaron Bielenberg, who is a mathematics major at Mendocino …


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Sex + City wraps up 2/13

During the week leading up to Valentine’s Day, a group of City College clubs will present Sex⊕City, a campaign of events promoting the sex positivity movement.

Sex Positivity is a social movement that “seeks to promote healthy concepts about topics related to human sexuality through a stigma-free educational environment,”according to the event’s official website.

Sac City Freethinkers faculty adviser and graphic communication Professor Don Button said …


Dalal Scarbrough (Left), Linguistics major, asks about information to transfer to U.C. Berkeley while Simran Thiara (Right), Economy major acquires information to transfer to Sacramento State.
Luisa Morco | Staff Photographer | luisamorco.express@gmail.com

Scholarship money up for grabs

Students who are looking for a little extra financial boost can apply for scholarships through the SCC Foundation or the City College Transfer Center.

Both the Foundation and the Transfer Center offer several scholarship opportunities for students, many of which require very little effort to apply for, according to the facilitators of the programs.


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The importance of humanities

“Do you think the main role of college is to make students ready for the job market? If so, why? If not, why not?”

This may sound like a test question, but it’s actually a question posed by Katherine Schulten in a Nov. 16 article in the New York Times. In the article, Schulten suggests that college students are losing interest in the humanities as majors.

She questions whether higher education should just be about vocational and job training as opposed to focusing on the teaching of critical thinking, expanding knowledge of the world and exposing students to diverse attitudes.

As the scope of college changes, especially at community colleges, it’s certainly an interesting and relevant question. How important is it to study  elds like philosophy, culture, languages, music, art and history when these are  elds that don’t easily translate into jobs?


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Volunteer to give thanks

The sights and sounds of the holidays are upon us, as Sacramento residents and Americans across the nation begin to decorate their houses for Halloween—some even for Christmas already—and purchase hoards of goods from multiple retail locations.

The City College Panther statue was covered in pumpkins recently for a Queer/Straight Alliance club fund-raiser selling those plump little orange squash. While this was for a noble cause, raising money for a college club, it seems this is what the holidays have become more and more in recent years.

Specifically, Thanksgiving and Christmas have become so commercial that most people celebrate these holidays without even realizing what they’re all about.


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‘I Have a Dream’ for City College

The U.S. recently celebrated the 50-year anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, originally given on Aug. 28, 1963, in…