Able to be of service; Proctored Center provides testing assistance for students with disabilities

Track ball mice and special keyboards designed for students with ocular disabilities are a few of the pieces of equipment you can find in the Proctored Testing Center at City College Feb. 2. | Photo by Bobby Castagna | Photo Editor |

Rose Vega
Staff Reporter

About 11 percent of college students report having a disability, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. These disabilities include everything from difficulty walking to mental impairment. For assistance with taking tests, students at City College turn to the Proctored Testing Center.

“Most people think that running a Proctoring Center is a piece of cake. All you have to do is watch someone take an exam. There is so much more than this,” says Aurora Dalske, student personnel assistant, who manages the Proctored Testing Center for Disability Services and Programs for Students, or DSPS.

“We try our best to provide a positive environment and experience for our students that take quizzes or exams here with us, utilizing their DSPS counselor-approved testing accommodations,” says Dalske.

DSPS has to approve students for their required testing needs before they can make an appointment at the Proctored Testing Center, Dalske says. Once they have their accommodations, students have to schedule their tests with the proctoring center at least two to three days in advance. The testing center does not except any drop-ins. Professors also state what materials students are allowed to use during tests.

The testing center is made up of nine people, all of them are students, except for Dalske who is the only permanent staff. Working at the testing center is just like any other job and everyone who works there is a paid employee, says Dalske.

“This job requires good communication and listening skills. It’s also important that we are compassionate and patient individuals when it comes to working with our students,” says Dalske, who aims to make sure every student feels comfortable taking exams and working with the people at the proctoring center.

Proctors not only monitor the students while they take their tests but if someone requires a scribe or needs the test to be read to them, then the proctors assist with that as well. The staff also makes sure that they are able to take the tests in a quiet environment, says Emma Brown, a biology major who works at the proctoring center as a clerk.

“There are certain students who have physical disabilities, and that’s always very rewarding because you’re either someones eyes or someone’s hand,” says Ulysses Gonzalez, Photography major, who works at the Proctored Testing Center as a clerk.

“It’s really encouraging that even though they have disabilities, they’re still coming to school and doing good,” says Gonzalez, who finds the job rewarding because of his ability to help students achieve their academic goals.

“I feel good about helping to provide this important service to our students,” says Carmen Pereira, temporary clerk at the Proctored Testing Center, who started working at the center three years ago.

“Those that are really grateful and they say it to you. They’re very sincere, some even bring gifts and thank you cards,” Pereira says, as well as being a clerk she also proctors, as do all the other clerks at the testing center.

“That’s really rewarding to know that they’re really appreciating the service here and that we’re doing something important,” says Pereira.

You can find the Proctored Testing Center in Student Services 140.


Monday–Thursday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.